Android developer get cpu usage

 

It's worth a quick reminder that the Samsung Galaxy S4 is one one of the first devices to actually launch with Android 4.2.2.  And it's also worth a reminder that the developer options are hidden by default starting with that version of Android . As those of us who have been using Nexus devices for the past quickly learned, you'll need to spend about 20 seconds and a few taps of the ol' index finger -- OK, any finger will do -- to open up the nether regions of your Galaxy S4. 

Go to Settings-->About Phone. Tap on the "Android version" quickly until you see a jelly bean. Tap and hold that jelly bean until the screen turns to a legion of floating jelly beans. Send a few beans flying around, then return to Settings-->Display-->Daydream and the option of BeanFlinger should be there. Enjoy!

I did the steps above on my S3 and it gave me the floating Jelly Beans, it's only 4.1.2 so no day dream but I never knew it was there, thanks!

Android developer get cpu usage

Android Debug Bridge (adb) is a versatile command-line tool that lets you communicate with a device (an emulator or a connected Android device). The adb command facilitates a variety of device actions, such as installing and debugging apps, and it provides access to a Unix shell that you can use to run a variety of commands on a device. It is a client-server program that includes three components:

adb is included in the Android SDK Platform-Tools package. You can download this package with the SDK Manager , which installs it at android_sdk /platform-tools/ . Or if you want the standalone Android SDK Platform-Tools package, you can download it here .

When you start an adb client, the client first checks whether there is an adb server process already running. If there isn't, it starts the server process. When the server starts, it binds to local TCP port 5037 and listens for commands sent from adb clients—all adb clients use port 5037 to communicate with the adb server.

It's worth a quick reminder that the Samsung Galaxy S4 is one one of the first devices to actually launch with Android 4.2.2.  And it's also worth a reminder that the developer options are hidden by default starting with that version of Android . As those of us who have been using Nexus devices for the past quickly learned, you'll need to spend about 20 seconds and a few taps of the ol' index finger -- OK, any finger will do -- to open up the nether regions of your Galaxy S4. 

Go to Settings-->About Phone. Tap on the "Android version" quickly until you see a jelly bean. Tap and hold that jelly bean until the screen turns to a legion of floating jelly beans. Send a few beans flying around, then return to Settings-->Display-->Daydream and the option of BeanFlinger should be there. Enjoy!

I did the steps above on my S3 and it gave me the floating Jelly Beans, it's only 4.1.2 so no day dream but I never knew it was there, thanks!

We explain what are Android Developer Options, and show you how to access and enable Android Developer Options on any Android phone or Android tablet . PLUS: 34 things you can do in Android Developer Options. (See also: Best Android phones of 2016 UK .)

Every Android smartphone and Android tablet contains a secret set of options: Android Developer Options. As the name suggests these are intended principally for developers - people who need additional functions to test software and apps they are writing for Android devices. There are many options that allow you to simulate app stresses or enable debugging options.

Android Developer Options allow you to enable debugging over USB, capture bug reports on to your Android device, and show CPU usage on screen to measure the impact of your software.