Mobile spy quarterly billing buddies

 

Uncle Sam is a fictional character , a DC Comics superhero based on the national personification of the United States , Uncle Sam . Uncle Sam first appeared in National Comics #1 (July, 1940) and was created by Will Eisner .

Uncle Sam first appeared in National Comics #1 (July, 1940), which was published by Quality Comics during the Golden Age of Comic Books . He was depicted as a mystical being who was originally the spirit of a slain patriotic soldier from the American Revolutionary War , and who now appears in the world whenever his country needs him. The character was used for a few years from 1940 to 1944, briefly receiving its own series, Uncle Sam Quarterly . During this time, he had a young, non-costumed sidekick named Buddy Smith.

DC Comics acquired the character as part of its acquisition of the Quality characters in the 1950s, and he was used as a supporting character in Justice League of America in the 1970s. This established Uncle Sam as the leader of the Freedom Fighters , a team of former Quality characters that briefly received its own title. [1] This team was initially based on a parallel world called Earth-X, where World War II had lasted into the 1970s.

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Harriet the Spy is a children's novel written and illustrated by Louise Fitzhugh that was published in 1964 . It has been called "a milestone in children's literature" and a "classic". [3] [4] In the U.S. it ranked number 12 book for kids and number 17 all-time children's novel on two lists generated in 2012. [5] [6]

Harriet's best friends are Simon "Sport" Rocque, a serious boy who wants to be a CPA or a ball player, and Janie Gibbs, who wants to be a scientist. Harriet's enemies in her class are Marion Hawthorne, the teacher's pet and self-appointed queen bee of her class, and Marion's best friend and second-in-command, Rachel Hennessy.

Later at school, during her period game of tag , Harriet loses her notebook. Her classmates find it and are appalled at her brutally honest documentation of her opinions of them. For example, in her notebook she compares Sport to a "little old woman" for his continual worrying about his father. The students form a "Spy Catcher Club" in which they think up ways to make Harriet's life miserable, such as stealing her lunch, passing nasty notes about her in class, and spilling ink on her, but that backfires when Harriet slaps Marion in revenge, leaving a blue hand print on her face.

Uncle Sam is a fictional character , a DC Comics superhero based on the national personification of the United States , Uncle Sam . Uncle Sam first appeared in National Comics #1 (July, 1940) and was created by Will Eisner .

Uncle Sam first appeared in National Comics #1 (July, 1940), which was published by Quality Comics during the Golden Age of Comic Books . He was depicted as a mystical being who was originally the spirit of a slain patriotic soldier from the American Revolutionary War , and who now appears in the world whenever his country needs him. The character was used for a few years from 1940 to 1944, briefly receiving its own series, Uncle Sam Quarterly . During this time, he had a young, non-costumed sidekick named Buddy Smith.

DC Comics acquired the character as part of its acquisition of the Quality characters in the 1950s, and he was used as a supporting character in Justice League of America in the 1970s. This established Uncle Sam as the leader of the Freedom Fighters , a team of former Quality characters that briefly received its own title. [1] This team was initially based on a parallel world called Earth-X, where World War II had lasted into the 1970s.

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The Soviets did not lack for available recruits for spying, says John Earl Haynes, espionage historian and author of Early Cold War Spies . What drove these college-educated Americans and Britons to sell their nations' atomic secrets? Some were ideologically motivated, enamored of communist beliefs, explains Haynes. Others were motivated by the notion of nuclear parity; one way to prevent a nuclear war, they reasoned, was to make sure that no nation had a monopoly on that awesome power.

For many years, the depth of Soviet spying was unknown. The big breakthrough began in 1946 when the United States, working with Britain, deciphered the code Moscow used to send its telegraph cables. Venona, as the decoding project was named, remained an official secret until it was declassified in 1995. Because government authorities did not want to reveal that they had cracked the Russian code, Venona evidence could not be used in court, but it could trigger investigations and surveillance hoping to nail suspects in the act of spying or extract a confession from them. As Venona decryption improved in the late 1940s and early 1950s, it blew the cover of several spies.

Investigations resulted in the execution or imprisonment of a dozen or more people who had passed atomic secrets to the Soviets, but no one knows how many spies got away. Here are some of the ones we know about: